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7 Tips to Cope with Redundancy

Redundancy, there is no easy way around it. Dealing with job loss at the best of times is difficult in itself, let alone during a pandemic. As we entered 2020, we didn’t expect to be hit by a global pandemic, nor did we expect to be laid off from jobs.

Most of us likely hadn’t heard of the term ‘furlough’ before March this year. However the unfortunate situation has left a large portion of the population in turbulent situations, financially, mentally, and emotionally.

If you’re currently facing redundancy we understand this is an uncertain and hard-hitting time. We’re sharing 7 tips on how to mitigate the challenges you may be dealing with.

1. Remember it is the role that is redundant, not you

It is easy to take redundancy personally. Being laid off from your job due to financial circumstances within the business is out of your control. However, rest assured it is natural and human to feel burnt from the situation. Our ego has wonderful ways of blaming ourselves or that it is a personal critique. Remember to depersonalise the redundancy. It was a difficult decision for the business to make and not an aggrievance against you.

2. Your skills, experience and value have not diminished

Being made redundant is not a reflection of your ability to do your job. While undoubtedly it is a difficult and unsettling time, hold onto the positives. If you are struggling with self-esteem, look to achievements you have accomplished in your career. In particular focus on goals and rewards in your most recent role. Recognise your strengths and channel your energy into them in your job search.

Three colleagues chatting and laughing

3. Network, network, network

In times of need, your network may well be your most powerful tool. In life, the more you move the more opportunities come your way. Whilst meeting face to face is difficult and limited at the moment, we can make use of our online network.

LinkedIn is a professional platform and sharing a post to your network opens you up to many opportunities. Once others begin to comment, like or share your post, it will reach a wider audience. You can also ask ex-colleagues if they can help in any way. When it comes to searching for a new job, referrals do fast track you in the recruitment process.

4. Don’t be disheartened by job rejections

Much like the aforementioned, a lot of roles are given to internal candidates or referred to via other contacts. If you don’t get a reply online, don’t be disheartened or take it personally. Job boards often rely on automated selection criteria and algorithms through key words. You may well be the best candidate in the pool of applicants but the computer, unfortunately, says no. 

5. Refine your CV

When we’ve been in a job for a while looking for a new one can feel incredibly daunting. Our CV quickly becomes outdated and lacks in originality. Look into finding a mentor who could help review your CV and give you pointers to refresh the content or format. Think about what your USP is and what will make you stand out from other candidates and push this at the forefront of your applications.

6. Give yourself a break

Looking for a job is tiring and exhausting, take time out to do things you enjoy too. Make time for friends, family and people around you as well as downtime to read, watch your favourite TV show or exercise. It is acceptable to have downtime between job searching, so there is no need to feel guilty for it.  

7. Upskill

Enhance your competitiveness and upskill. There are a lot of online courses for free through the likes of Coursera and Future Learn that can be done in your own time. If you’ve wanted to develop professionally but have struggled to find the time in the past, now is the time. Put a positive spin on your redundancy – life is providing you the time and space to make time for the things you didn’t have in the past.

Everymind is on a mission to normalise mental health conversations in the workplace, if we can help please get in touch. 

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